A Podcast with Amy Ryan, star of Gone Baby Gone and Jack Goes Boating

By Adam Lippe

Here’s a podcast with Amy Ryan, Oscar nominated for Gone Baby Gone and Jack Goes Boating, which she was promoting in this particular case. The film is the directorial debut of Phillip Seymour Hoffman, who you can see in the photo to your left, accompanied by his dreadlocks. There were seven of us in the room with Amy and the occasion was brief, so we only had time for a few questions each, which probably makes my absolutely absurd first question either an utter waste of time or an utter waste of time.  In my ongoing mission to get more people to see The Missing Person, which Amy produced, that film is the subject of my second question, and her answer will make even more sense when you hear part II of Noah Buschel’s podcast, which will be up quite soon (part I is here). As for Jack Goes Boating, it’s a small, odd film, based on a stage play, with awkward humor and even more awkward people. It’s playing in limited release now, and some of the questions asked by my colleagues will add to your understanding of the film. Hopefully.

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Now on DVD and Blu-Ray

Roadracers

By Adam Lippe

Whenever there’s a genre parody or ode to a specific era of films, such as Black Dynamite’s mocking of Blaxploitation films or Quentin Tarantino’s Death Proof, the second half of Grindhouse, the danger is that the film might fall into the trap of either being condescending without any particular insight, or so faithful that it becomes the very flawed thing it is emulating.

Black Dynamite has nothing new to say about Blaxploitation films, it just does a decent job of copying what an inept [...]


Veegie Awards

Winner: BEST ONLINE FILM CRITIC, 2010 National Veegie Awards (Vegan Themed Entertainment)

Nominee: BEST NEW PRODUCT, 2011 National Veegie Awards: The Vegan Condom

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Featured Quote (written by me)

On Cold Fish:

Though the 16 year old me described the 1994 weepie Angie, starring Geena Davis as a Brooklyn mother raising her new baby alone, as “maudlin and melodramatic,” Roger Ebert, during his TV review, referring to the multitude of soap-operaish problems piling up on the titular character, suggested that it was only in Hollywood where Angie would get a happy ending. “If they made this movie in France, Angie would have shot herself.”

Well Cold Fish was made in Japan, where Angie would have shot herself and that would have been the happy ending.