Tag Archive

How Do You Know

By Adam Lippe

A visual motif is supposed to be used to express a feeling that is never overtly expressed by the characters, revealing something about them that they’re unaware of or trying to hide. A perfect example is Tammy Metzler in the movie Election, and the use of garbage that she either hides behind or hangs out […]

Dare

By Adam Lippe

A filmmaker given money to expand his own short film into a feature has quite a conundrum. Should he try to work with the same materials and simply stretch the concept thin? Should he add distracting subplots in order to pad the running time and simply leave the short as it is, footage intact, such […]

Quit Ho Mo on the radio: A radio interview about going undercover as an ex-gay

By Adam Lippe

This is the radio interview I did with the editors of Outlook Weekly. The broadcast was about a two-part story I did for Outlook where I pretended be an ex-gay going through Christian reorientation therapy. The first part, which you can read here, appeared in Outlook Weekly in June of 2008, the second part, which […]

Quit Ho Mo: Undercover with the ex-gays: Part II

By Adam Lippe

This is the second installment in a two-part series on Christian reorientation therapy.  The first part, which you can read here, appeared in Outlook Weekly in June of 2008, the second part ran in September of 2008. There’s also a radio interview I did with the editors of Outlook, since the second, longer piece was […]

The Merry Gentleman

By Adam Lippe

In the pantheon of films about depressed hitmen either on their last job or on the verge of suicide, The Merry Gentleman stands tall, in the middle of the pack. Not as insightful, moving, nor funny as the William H. Macy starring Panic* or as wonderfully awful as Nicholas Cage’s foray in the remake of […]

Happy Accidents

By Adam Lippe

Happy Accidents looks like a trendy romantic comedy. It had Vincent D’onofrio circa 1999 (though the movie wasn’t released until 2001), and it was made right after writer/director Brad Anderson’s excellent and ignored Next Stop, Wonderland.* It even has the K-Pax/Man Facing Southeast plot of a guy who may or not be insane and how […]

Now on DVD and Blu-Ray

Roadracers

By Adam Lippe

Whenever there’s a genre parody or ode to a specific era of films, such as Black Dynamite’s mocking of Blaxploitation films or Quentin Tarantino’s Death Proof, the second half of Grindhouse, the danger is that the film might fall into the trap of either being condescending without any particular insight, or so faithful that it becomes the very flawed thing it is emulating.

Black Dynamite has nothing new to say about Blaxploitation films, it just does a decent job of copying what an inept [...]


Veegie Awards

Winner: BEST ONLINE FILM CRITIC, 2010 National Veegie Awards (Vegan Themed Entertainment)

Nominee: BEST NEW PRODUCT, 2011 National Veegie Awards: The Vegan Condom

Archive

Featured Quote (written by me)

On Cold Fish:

Though the 16 year old me described the 1994 weepie Angie, starring Geena Davis as a Brooklyn mother raising her new baby alone, as “maudlin and melodramatic,” Roger Ebert, during his TV review, referring to the multitude of soap-operaish problems piling up on the titular character, suggested that it was only in Hollywood where Angie would get a happy ending. “If they made this movie in France, Angie would have shot herself.”

Well Cold Fish was made in Japan, where Angie would have shot herself and that would have been the happy ending.