A podcast with Amanda Fuller, the star of Red, White & Blue

By Adam Lippe

Amanda in Primal Doubt

Here’s a podcast with Amanda Fuller, the star of Red, White & Blue. This interview was recorded in August of 2010, but because of the quick blip on the theatrical radar the film got, I decided to wait until it came out on DVD to release the interview. Now, considering Amanda and I do discuss the conclusion of Red, White & Blue in quite a bit of detail, I wanted to give those who wanted to see the film (which came out on DVD in May) a chance before ruining the final 30 minutes for them. The spoilers begin around the 35 minute mark and if you’ve seen the film already or it’s not something you’d ever see, you’ll probably enjoy the spirited back and forth between us about how the movie should have ended.

Amanda in Red, White, and Blue. Yes, I did ask her about her resemblance to Pia Zadora.

The rest of the interview covers her career, including her role as Donna’s sister on That ’70s Show, some of the smaller film and TV roles she’s had, if she’s afraid of being typecast as a girl who is willing to get sliced up in a horror film, but take her top off first, amongst others.

Marc Senter as "The Warriors Guy"

As for the stray details that need context,  when I refer to “The Warriors Guy” that’s Mark Senter, and you can see him in his Red, White & Blue  regalia below. The q+a that I refer to is because I met Amanda at a screening of Red, White, and Blue last July at the Danger After Dark festival in Philadelphia. Primal Doubt is a TV movie she made for the Lifetime channel a few years ago, and the lead of the film was Janine Turner.

There’s also an extra bonus bit of conversation at the very end.

Amanda as Donna's sister in That'70s Show

Download the full podcast below or subscribe to it on Itunes (search for A Regrettable Moment of Sincerity).

 

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Roadracers

By Adam Lippe

Whenever there’s a genre parody or ode to a specific era of films, such as Black Dynamite’s mocking of Blaxploitation films or Quentin Tarantino’s Death Proof, the second half of Grindhouse, the danger is that the film might fall into the trap of either being condescending without any particular insight, or so faithful that it becomes the very flawed thing it is emulating.

Black Dynamite has nothing new to say about Blaxploitation films, it just does a decent job of copying what an inept [...]


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Featured Quote (written by me)

On Cold Fish:

Though the 16 year old me described the 1994 weepie Angie, starring Geena Davis as a Brooklyn mother raising her new baby alone, as “maudlin and melodramatic,” Roger Ebert, during his TV review, referring to the multitude of soap-operaish problems piling up on the titular character, suggested that it was only in Hollywood where Angie would get a happy ending. “If they made this movie in France, Angie would have shot herself.”

Well Cold Fish was made in Japan, where Angie would have shot herself and that would have been the happy ending.