Tag Archive

Montenegro

By Adam Lippe

Apparently, rich people are very bored. And when they’re not bored, they’re panicked. What are they panicked about, though? From the way the current economic meltdown is going, the wealthy are going out of their way not to spend money so as not to look like they’re wealthy — suggesting there’s not much pride in […]

Rad

By Adam Lippe

If Reckless, the Romeo and Juliet-style vehicle for Aidan Quinn and Daryl Hannah contains the most overtly sexual high school dance sequence in all 1980s teen films (with the pair ogling each other to the sound of Romeo Void’s Never Say Never featuring the all too subtle lyric, “I Might Like You Better if We […]

The 5 minute feature film, volume 2: This World, Then the Fireworks

By Adam Lippe

Here is volume 2 of the 5 Minute Feature Film series, this time on Michael Oblowitz’s adaptation of Jim Thompson’s This World, Then the Fireworks. The 5 Minute Feature Film series is where I take a full length movie and cut it down to 5 minutes in length, re-score it, but tell basically the same […]

The 5 minute feature film, volume 1: Trespass

By Adam Lippe

As a companion piece to my analysis of Nicolas Cage’s current career, below is a visual summation of his 2011 movie Trespass, co-starring Nicole Kidman and Cam Gigandet. I’ve edited the entire thing down to just under 5 minutes, briefly glossing over important plot points (without major spoilers), yet you’ll still get the sense of […]

Nicolas Cage and the Temple of Contractual Obligation

By Adam Lippe

When my girlfriend and I moved to Columbus, Ohio, we did not have much time to find a place to live. We settled on a location that was converted from a post office to a building full of large lofts. The apartment was huge, but it had quite a few deficits. There were no lights […]

Keep Fooling Yourself: The Films of Dylan Kidd

By Adam Lippe

Somehow, despite being made by a first time filmmaker in love with his own dialogue and with a tendency to smear sentimentality in where it shouldn’t be, Dylan Kidd’s Roger Dodger is one of the better low profile studio/independent films of the decade. Campbell Scott, though he is given all the best lines as a […]

Dogville

By Adam Lippe

Amazing that Lars Von Trier has made the exact same movie three times and no one has noticed. Which film does this describe? A troubled yet innocent and angelic woman tries her best to do right by her family and her small town, but her innocence causes corruption and brings out the worst in everyone […]

Europa

By Adam Lippe

Here’s the idea behind “A Canadian, an American, a Lawyer, and an Elitist”: Rhett’s favorite movie is “Meatballs 4″, Shawn has an unhealthy fixation on Resident Evil, Richard scoffs at anything that isn’t pretentious and hoity toity, and Adam is a prick who hates everything. We all watch far too many movies, and spend our […]

Tesis

By Adam Lippe

Though it is thought of as a necessity in a horror movie or a “thriller,” there is no real reason, apart from a lack of creativity, why characters must act in an unintelligent manner in order to find themselves in threatening situations, thus providing thrills for the audience. It’s more insulting than anything else and […]

Now on DVD and Blu-Ray

Roadracers

By Adam Lippe

Whenever there’s a genre parody or ode to a specific era of films, such as Black Dynamite’s mocking of Blaxploitation films or Quentin Tarantino’s Death Proof, the second half of Grindhouse, the danger is that the film might fall into the trap of either being condescending without any particular insight, or so faithful that it becomes the very flawed thing it is emulating.

Black Dynamite has nothing new to say about Blaxploitation films, it just does a decent job of copying what an inept [...]


Veegie Awards

Winner: BEST ONLINE FILM CRITIC, 2010 National Veegie Awards (Vegan Themed Entertainment)

Nominee: BEST NEW PRODUCT, 2011 National Veegie Awards: The Vegan Condom

Archive

Featured Quote (written by me)

On Cold Fish:

Though the 16 year old me described the 1994 weepie Angie, starring Geena Davis as a Brooklyn mother raising her new baby alone, as “maudlin and melodramatic,” Roger Ebert, during his TV review, referring to the multitude of soap-operaish problems piling up on the titular character, suggested that it was only in Hollywood where Angie would get a happy ending. “If they made this movie in France, Angie would have shot herself.”

Well Cold Fish was made in Japan, where Angie would have shot herself and that would have been the happy ending.